Posted in Butterfly Cinquain

Thank You Essentials

Mask

The few

Essential ones

Their dedication and

Skills kept us going at night and day

Let’s not

Forget

Their faithful determination

To face fear head on

In such a time

As this

Butterfly Cinquain

While I appreciate and salute all who served as essentials during COVID-19, I specifically want to dedicate this poem to my grand-daughter Vivian, age 21, who is a care-giver at a nursing home.

Vivian faithfully worked many long and extra shifts to take care of the residents during quarantine.

And also, want to dedicate this poem to my other grand-daughter’s boyfriend, Michael, age 20, who is an auto maintenance worker, earning minimum wage. Micheal faithfully worked many long days and extra hours with no extra raise in wages during this time of pandemic.

Thanks to both of these hard working young people and many others I don’t know.

Let’s remember it was people like this that kept our country going during the pandemic.

Posted in December 2019, Syllable Lune

Flowing Forward

Sign saying “Keep Going”

When weariness comes

Keep Going

Flowing like a river

Syllable Lune

I was a bit weary today. One of those days when doubts step in and began dragging you down and you just feel defeated, like you can’t go on, but then…I saw this sign on a shelf in a thrift store, it said: “Keep Going” and I felt it was meant for me, so I perked myself up and kept going, and guess what?

I had a great day! 😊

Think positive thoughts

Keep Going

Weariness will leave

Syllable Lune

Posted in April 2018, NaPoWriMo 2018, Syllabic Verse

Ceaseless Hope

Blue feather

Commit to always keep going non-stop

Singing a song only your heart knows

Clinging to a belief deep within

That will give your soul the wings to fly

Syllablic Verse

(Based on this poem by Emily Dickinson)

“Hope is the thing with feathers

That perches in the soul,

And sings the tune without the words,

And never stops at all,”

–Emily Dickinson

NaPoWriMo 2018 Day 18

prompt for the day isn’t exactly based in revision, but it’s not exactly not based in revision, either. It also sounds a bit more complicated than it is, so bear with me! First, find a poem in a book or magazine (ideally one you are not familiar with). Use a piece of paper to cover over everything but the last line. Now write a line of your own that completes the thought of that single line you can see, or otherwise responds to it. Now move your piece of paper up to uncover the second-to-last line of your source poem, and write the second line of your new poem to complete/respond to this second-to-last line. Keep going, uncovering and writing, until you get to the first line of your source poem, which you will complete/respond to as the last line of your new poem