Posted in Senryu

Bit Bewildered

Question Marks

Reading today’s news

Some days are so obscure

Obfuscating words

Senryu

Dictionary.com’s Word for the Day is “Obfuscate”. It seemed very fitting as I read some of today’s news reports.

Word of the Day – obfuscate | Dictionary.com

Posted in August 2019, Choka

Redoubtable Enemy

Knights in battle

Quite fearful, yes,

A formidable opponent,

Sent to cause fear.

Yet God’s Armor protects me,

If I but wear it,

And stand firm resisting this

Foe, who hurls his darts

Of doubt, trying to wound my heart,

Until they meet the shield of faith.

Choka

Poem Inspired by Dictionary.com—Word Of The Day—Redoubtable

Origin

English redoubtable comes from Middle English redoutable “terrible, frightening, worthy of honor, venerable,” ultimately from Old French redotable, redoubtable, a derivative of the verb redouter “to fear, dread.” Redouter is formed from a French use of the prefix re- as an intensive (for instance, in refine), a use that Latin re- does not have, and from Latin dubitāre “to doubt, hesitate, waver” (but not “to fear”). Redoubtable entered English in the first half of the 15th century.

Posted in August 2019, Cinquain

Satisfy Your Thirst

Giraffe drinking water at a water hole

Slack—Slake

Don’t slack—Do slake

Be a slaker, not a slacker

Do you see? Drop the C, and then add an E

Slake it

Cinquain

Slake is “The Word of the Day” at dictionary.com

“Slake means “to lessen or allay something by satisfying it.” While we can slake our curiosity, desire, hunger, or anger, we most commonly say we slake our thirst.

Slake comes from Middle English slaken “to mitigate, allay, moderate, lessen one’s efforts,” from Old English slacian “to slacken.” Old English slacian is a verb based off the adjective sleac, slæc, variously meaning “loose, lazy, careless, sluggish, lax (of conduct),” which by Middle English (as slac, slak) narrowed to the sense of “loose, not tight,” the principal sense of its modern form, slack, today.

Old English sleac (via Germanic slak-) derives from the Proto-Indo-European root (s)lēg-, which, in its Latin variants, ultimately yielded such English words as languid, languish, lax, lease, release, and relax.

Once again, etymology offers an important life lesson: it’s best not to languish, so slake your thirst—with a beverage of your choice—and relax, but don’t be too lax about it and slack off.”

Word Origin—quoted from Dictionary.com)

Posted in July 2019, Syllabic Verse

Beset by Remora

Remora, tiny sucker fish,
Image from: https://images.app.goo.gl/9LAESEiMA75akuML7

Tiny remora

Surrounds, holds me back

All my human strength

Not enough to overcome

Only blood of Christ

Can wash it away

Syllabic Verse

Remora is today’s “The Word of the Day” at Dictionary.com

See the definition and interesting origin of this word “remora” at this link:

http://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day/remora-2019-07-15/

In ancient times, the remora was believed to stop a ship from sailing. In Latin, remora means “delay”, while the genus name Echeneis comes from Greek εχειν, echein (“to hold”) and ναυς, naus (“a ship”). In a notable account by Pliny the Elder, the remora is blamed for the defeat of Mark Antony at the Battle of Actium and, indirectly, for the death of Caligula.[15] A modern version of the story is given by Jorge Luis Borges in Book of Imaginary Beings(1957).

Source:Wikipedia

Posted in March 2019, Tanka

Palimpsest

Blank paper, pencils, eraser, light bulb

Has it been so long

That we have forgotten

The New Year challenge?

80 days have quietly passed,

What’s your new year story say?

Tanka

Dictionary.com Word Of The Day

Palimpsest

noun

1. a parchment or the like from which writing has been partially or completely erased to make room for another text.

Quotes

All history was a palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary.
— George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four,