Posted in Haiku, November 2019

Full Beaver Moon

Full Beaver Moon in Oregon  11-13-19
Original photo of The Full Beaver Moon in Oregon 11-13-19

In the dark stillness

November’s moon reigns on high

Stars hide from view

Haiku

I was fortunate tonight to be able to walk outside about 6:30 pm and see the moon in its giant fullness. The sky was in total darkness except for this gigantic moon. The photo I took with my cellphone doesn’t really show its beauty and size. It truly was a sight to see.

Amy Nieskens of the Old Farmer’s Almanac guide said: “Centuries ago Native Americans kept track of the changing seasons by giving a distinct name to each Full Moon – names we still use today.

“November’s Full Moon was known as the Geese-going Moon, the Frost Moon and perhaps the most well known, the Full Beaver Moon.

“Traditionally this is the time of year that beavers are preparing for winter and also the time to set traps before the swamps froze, to ensure supplies of warm winter furs.”

Posted in Haibun, October 2019

Majestic Mount Hood

Mount Hood in Oregon
Mount Hood image from Wikipedia

Snow capped giant

Rises before me, I gaze

In awestruck wonder

Once more, Mount Hood, the sight of you has taken my breath away. Though miles away from me you loom in front of me like a blockade. Clouds hover above your snow capped peak. I gasp. You are intimidating, yet so beautiful.

I remember when I visited you and stood at your base, smelled your mountain air, and trembled at your majesty.

None other I have seen strike me with awe like you do giant rock.

Haibun

OctPoWriMo 2019

For info on Mount Hood visit this link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Hood

Posted in Cinquain, May 2019

Oregon’s Six Thousand

We went

We lost our lives

We won freedom for you

We ask only that you not forget

Our deeds

Cinquain

Our local Christian church school that has a big grassy area next to their building implemented the idea of having their school children put up 6000 little flags to honor and pay tribute to the 6000 Oregon soldiers who lost their lives in all the wars.

I visited the display today and was deeply touched by how beautiful it was. Seeing all those little flags blowing in the soft breeze made me so thankful for the freedom we enjoy in our country and for those who paid the price to achieve it.

Posted in Choka, December 2018

The Green Raincoat

Green Raincoat

Love thy neighbor

Standing in the pouring rain

On a city corner

Not dressed for Winter weather

Yet he didn’t complain

Though he’s covered in raindrops

From his head to foot

He smiles and says he’s thankful

It’s not a hot, sunny day

Choka

Today was a wet, windy, winter day as Oregon winters usually are. I didn’t really want to be out in it but I needed coffee for tomorrow’s breakfast so I made a quick run to the grocery.

I left the store feeling pretty cheery as my coffee was on sale and the bottles I returned put an extra $2.00 cash in my pocket.

As I was driving out of the store parking lot I got stopped at the red light, where a young man in only a thin shirt and pants was standing holding a soggy cardboard sign that said “Anything Helps. Have a Blessed Day”

Feeling he must be pretty desperate to be out in this weather, I rolled down my window and handed him the $2.00 cash I had just gotten. He took it and said “Thank You”.

“It’s pretty rainy and chilly out here today” I said, making conversation as the light was still red.

Though he was soaked from head to foot he smiled and said it was better than a hot sunny day and that he would rather be wet from rain than sweat.

Even so, I told him there was a thrift shop in town where he might be able to get a raincoat free. He said he knew that but had to wait until next month to get his voucher.

The light turned green and I had to move on.

I called my daughter. “Do you happen to have a raincoat at your house that no one is using?” I asked.

“Just that green one you gave me last summer” she replied.

Ah, the Green Raincoat. I had found it in a box marked “Free” at a yard sale I was at this summer. I took it with me that day thinking my daughter or someone in our family could use it, but no one had. It had just hung on a hook waiting for this time in life. It’s purpose had been found. It was going to someone who really needed it.

The young man smiled as I returned and and gave him the raincoat.

“You have a Blessed Day” he said, as he put on the green raincoat which fit him perfectly.

Unwanted and discarded

Have you ever felt that way?

Banished, set free

Judged unworthy by those

Who don’t see your value

You go through life hanging ‘round

Waiting and hoping

The day will come when you

Are noticed, needed

Choka