Posted in Double Butterfly Cinquain, September 2019

Simultaneous Sights and Sounds

Sunset

Last night

The sun painted

The western sky orange red,

While fingers plucked harp strings

Inside.

Soothing sounds enveloped my ears,

Drowning out the darkness

Of reality

Outside.

A home

Just blocks away,

While my ears heard sweet words,

Others were being torn apart

Inside,

As the blackness of a cold heart,

Unleased its bitterness,

Drowning a soul

In tears.

Double Butterfly Cinquain

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Posted in August 2019, Scripture, Senryu

Functioning Faith

Mustard seeds

Planting mustard seeds

On my knees, moving mountains,

Breaking down barriers.

Senryu

Believe and Pray:

And Jesus said unto them, Because of your unbelief: for verily I say unto you, If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible unto you. Matthew 17:20 KJV

Posted in August 2019, Cinquain

Satisfy Your Thirst

Giraffe drinking water at a water hole

Slack—Slake

Don’t slack—Do slake

Be a slaker, not a slacker

Do you see? Drop the C, and then add an E

Slake it

Cinquain

Slake is “The Word of the Day” at dictionary.com

“Slake means “to lessen or allay something by satisfying it.” While we can slake our curiosity, desire, hunger, or anger, we most commonly say we slake our thirst.

Slake comes from Middle English slaken “to mitigate, allay, moderate, lessen one’s efforts,” from Old English slacian “to slacken.” Old English slacian is a verb based off the adjective sleac, slæc, variously meaning “loose, lazy, careless, sluggish, lax (of conduct),” which by Middle English (as slac, slak) narrowed to the sense of “loose, not tight,” the principal sense of its modern form, slack, today.

Old English sleac (via Germanic slak-) derives from the Proto-Indo-European root (s)lēg-, which, in its Latin variants, ultimately yielded such English words as languid, languish, lax, lease, release, and relax.

Once again, etymology offers an important life lesson: it’s best not to languish, so slake your thirst—with a beverage of your choice—and relax, but don’t be too lax about it and slack off.”

Word Origin—quoted from Dictionary.com)

Posted in July 2019, Senryu

Speak Seeds

Plant, in hands, seedling

Twas just a few words

They caused a mind to think

A seed was planted

Senryu

Words are also seeds, and when dropped into the invisible spiritual substance, they grow and bring forth after their kind. –Charles Fillmore

(So then, be sure the words you speak are good words)

Posted in May 2019, Shadorma

Prolific Writer’s Homes

Paper House created by @LeonasDesigns 2019
Paper House ©️LeonasDesigns2019

Paper houses

Filled with ink pens

Abundantly

Inscribing

Copious amounts of words

On every wall

Shadorma

This poem was inspired by a note my Creative Writing Instructor emailed to me after I submitted my final portfolio to him for grading this semester.

He gave me a A as my final grade, plus said I had a gift for writing, was a very prolific writer, and was a great storyteller.

It was a blessing and encouragement to hear that, as he is not only an instructor, but also quite an accomplished and published writer himself.

No one has ever called me “prolific” before, except God did say: in Psalm 92:14 that “They shall still bear fruit in old age; They shall be fresh and flourishing,” (prolific means fruitful or abundant) and I have always believed upon that verse for myself.

So thank you God for blessing me with a prolific writing ability. I pray I can use it to bring You glory.

.