Posted in Cinquain, Scripture, September 2019

Rooted in the Word

Quote from Chuck Swindoll from his book “Growing Strong in the Seasons of Life”

How long

The winds do blow

Upon my weary head!

I dig in my heels, standing firm

In Him.

Cinquain

As you therefore have received Christ Jesus the Lord, so walk in Him,

rooted and built up in Him and established in the faith, as you have been taught, abounding in it with thanksgiving.

Colossians 2:6-7 NKJV

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Posted in Cinquain, Scripture, September 2019

This or That

Scatter kindness mixed media art
“Scatter Kindness” mixed media ATC by Leona J. Atkinson

Scattered

Everywhere

Tiny seeds of kindness

Some grew and joyfully to me

Returned

Cinquain

In the morning sow your seed,

And in the evening do not withhold your hand;

For you do not know which will prosper,

Either this or that,

Or whether both alike will be good.

EccL. 11:6 NKJV

Posted in August 2019, Cinquain

Cloudy Days

Clouds

Promises

Of sunny days

Dissolve as the dark clouds linger.

Each day summer’s warmth is cut short

It seems.

Cinquain

This summer we have not seen many sunny warm days.

The weather has been usually cool and even rainy.

Our fruit and vegetables have been aching for sunshine in order to ripen.

Each day I check the Weather App and smile as it tells me the high will be 80-85 and then as the day progresses my smile fades as the sun stays hidden and the temp doesn’t rise as predicted.

I keep hoping though that one of these days I will see summer arise again!

Posted in August 2019, Cinquain

Satisfy Your Thirst

Giraffe drinking water at a water hole

Slack—Slake

Don’t slack—Do slake

Be a slaker, not a slacker

Do you see? Drop the C, and then add an E

Slake it

Cinquain

Slake is “The Word of the Day” at dictionary.com

“Slake means “to lessen or allay something by satisfying it.” While we can slake our curiosity, desire, hunger, or anger, we most commonly say we slake our thirst.

Slake comes from Middle English slaken “to mitigate, allay, moderate, lessen one’s efforts,” from Old English slacian “to slacken.” Old English slacian is a verb based off the adjective sleac, slæc, variously meaning “loose, lazy, careless, sluggish, lax (of conduct),” which by Middle English (as slac, slak) narrowed to the sense of “loose, not tight,” the principal sense of its modern form, slack, today.

Old English sleac (via Germanic slak-) derives from the Proto-Indo-European root (s)lēg-, which, in its Latin variants, ultimately yielded such English words as languid, languish, lax, lease, release, and relax.

Once again, etymology offers an important life lesson: it’s best not to languish, so slake your thirst—with a beverage of your choice—and relax, but don’t be too lax about it and slack off.”

Word Origin—quoted from Dictionary.com)